Why stuff your rucksack?

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Why stuff your rucksack?: 

TILORI is a small forgotten village in the Cordillera Central mountainous region of Haiti, 7 km from the border with the Dominican Republic. There are approximately 300 families and 1500 children in the village and surrounding hills. In fact, nobody knows exactly how many people there are living in this area and most of these people survive on just one meal a day.

Africa Halisi Expeditions

Why stuff your rucksack?: 

Tanzania remains one of the poorest countries in the world due to a lack of exportable minerals, a primitive agricultural system and an economy stil blighted by past corruption. Amenities we take for granted are hard to come by in rural areas and would drastically improve a child's educational experience. The burden of carrying excess baggage will be lightened when you see the joy these vital supplies bring to their recipients.

African Lion and Environmental Research Trust (ALERT) Gweru

Why stuff your rucksack?: 

Destructive human activity is a threat to the park and the animals that live in it. The natural processes that offer vital resources to communities – such as access to clean water, good soil quality and wood for fuel – are being lost. ALERT offers environmental education and supports local services and an orphanage. In poor rural communities such as this, the need for basic items is great, and what you bring can empower people to find a way out of poverty without destroying the environment around them.

African Lion and Environmental Research Trust (ALERT) Livingstone

Why stuff your rucksack?: 

The Livingstone community has only basic provisions. While local amenities like schools are in need of improvement, development threatens the fragile natural environment. Part of the Trust’s work involves providing education and funding for local people so they can learn how to improve their lives without damaging the environment around them. Crucially, the organisation is looking into sustainable farming options that could make a real difference to the community. Items such as books and posters will be vital teaching aids for Trust volunteers.

African Lion and Environmental Research Trust (ALERT) Victoria Falls

Why stuff your rucksack?: 

The people living at Victoria Falls rely heavily on their natural environment for resources. ALERT works to provide them with the essentials they need in a way that doesn't damage the fragile ecosystems and the animals living there. Its rehabilitation program preserves the lion population, while funding and support improve schools and clinics. The simple items you bring can help people in the local community learn how to utilise natural resources, prevent disease, and improve their quality of life in a sustainable way.

AICM

Why stuff your rucksack?: 

Uganda is still suffering from the long Civil War, which is estimated to have displaced 1.8 million people. AICM gives these communities and children hope and an opportunity to lead better lives than they could have imagined. Any contribution will make a real impact on these people's lives.

Akany Avoko

Why stuff your rucksack?: 

The children and young people at Akany Avoko have been let down or mistreated for most of their lives, but as Simon from the home explains: “our kids simply refuse to be beaten, and seize the opportunities we are able to offer them with both hands.” You will find nothing but smiles, giggles and warmth at the home, which is both a safe environment and a place for education. Games, creative activities and entertainment are vital for their development, and anything you bring will help these children lead the healthy, happy lives they were previously denied.

Amani Kids

Why stuff your rucksack?: 

The children rescued by Amani Children's Home are usually either orphaned or homeless, and are in desperate need of help – at high risk of HIV transmission, malnutrition and abuse. At Amani's centre they receive education and guidance, a dedicated carer and are educated on, and tested for, HIV. Amazingly, as volunteer Nate observes, these children have “already been through a life's worth of pain and suffering, yet you could never tell”. Your items will help Amani continue to bring hope and happiness to those who need it.

Amazing Love School

Why stuff your rucksack?: 

Uganda suffers from chronic poverty and has the highest proportion of children orphaned by HIV/AIDS worldwide. Around 18% of children are not enrolled in school and the drop out rate averages at 66%. Street children and orphans are vulnerable to abuse and are sometimes abducted for use as child soldiers. The Amazing Love School offers an escape from that life to its children - any donation would make a hugely positive difference to these children's lives. 

Amazon Promise

Why stuff your rucksack?: 

The remote positioning and poverty of many communities in the Amazon Basin means that medical care is hard to come by. Belén, where the charity is building a new clinic, is a prime example of how urgently attention is needed: a sprawling river community where outdoor defecation, piles of rotting trash and water contamination are rife. Malnutrition is not uncommon, disease spreads fast and maternal and infant mortality rates are high. With your help, the charity can drastically improve life for the people of Belén, and many more who have to cope with similar conditions.

Amigos de Iracambi

Why stuff your rucksack?: 

Ninety-three per cent of the Atlantic Rainforest has disappeared due to human activity, and the rate of destruction is increasing – largely due to clearance for coffee farms. This not only destroys vital ecosystems, but also adversely affects the local economy: although small farmers receive some compensation for giving up their land, it is not enough for them to make a long-term investment. Your items can help empower local communities so farmers can establish a sustainable base for long-term economic development. 

Andrew Clark Trust

Why stuff your rucksack?: 

Just to see the faces of the children and parents will tell you that they are delighted with anything they are given however small. Please do not give money.

Angel Says: Read

Why stuff your rucksack?: 

Tourism has become the mainstay of the economy in Belize, and with pressing concerns including an unsustainable foreign debt, high unemployment, growing involvement in the South American drug trade, high crime rates, and increasing incidences of HIV/AIDS, the country relies heavily on international donors to reduce the level of poverty. Literacy levels are poor, particularly among the most destitute. By dropping off your books at one of the checkpoints across Belize, you can make a real impact,  strengthening the country's literacy rate.

Anglo-Thai Foundation

Why stuff your rucksack?: 

Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world. A long-term commitment makes the biggest difference. and the organisation is in need of further donations to ensure this support can continue.

Aquinoe Learning Centre Charitable Trust

Why stuff your rucksack?: 

Kitale has some government schools, but these can be incredibly overcrowded and under-resourced and classes may have up to eighty pupils so some non-government schools have been set up. ALC began as one of very few "inclusive" schools in the country, accepting mainstream pupils and those with disabilities alike. Thanks to the ALC school, marginalised children have the opportunity to learn and develop in a safe and inspiring environment.

Arise and Shine Children's Home

Why stuff your rucksack?: 

Since it was set up it 2005, Arise and Shine has provided a home for many children who arrive barefooted, with no other belongings than the rags they wear. Here they are given regular meals and clothes, attend the local school and as they mature are encouraged to become self-supporting adults. Your items will help to give these children the basics they need to enjoy life and thrive in the caring home provided for them. 

Art in Tanzania

Why stuff your rucksack?: 

Tanzania is one of the poorest countries in the world. More than a million children have been orphaned by AIDS and a third of the population lives under the poverty line. Art in Tanzania supports over 100 community schools and education centres throughout the country. Most have very few resources and receive little funding and therefore depend heavily on contributions and support from volunteers.  In addition many families cannot afford to send their children to school, despite the low fees.

Asha Deep Children's Shelter, El Shaddai Street Child Rescue

Why stuff your rucksack?: 

Asha Deep (or Light and Hope) is a day and night centre, and a world apart from the slums of Panaji. The shelter helps those who are in distress, homeless, or at risk from physical or sexual abuse, supplying ‘food and love’, clothes, medical attention, counselling and education. These children are in desperate situations, yet Asha Deep runs entirely on the support of well-wishers. So even the smallest of items makes a huge difference – and helps El Shaddai in its mission to "bring childhood to children who never had it".

Ashray Charitable Trusts

Why stuff your rucksack?: 

Visit the Nagwa slum today and you’ll find people have access to vital immunisation and treatment, education and food. This would not be possible without the dedication of the Ashray Charitable Trust. But there is still much work to be done: in winter many people do not have enough clothing to keep warm, and 70 children arrive at school shivering every morning. Items such as socks will help provide these people with the basic essentials many take for granted.
 

Asity Madagascar

Why stuff your rucksack?: 

Asity Madagascar plays a vital role in both preserving key species and helping local communities improve the quality of their lives. Working closely with people living in rural areas, Asity inspires communities to take responsibility for the nation’s natural resources, and highlights the benefits associated with protecting them. Items you bring will enable more people to get involved in safeguarding these important resources.

Aspire Rwanda

Why stuff your rucksack?: 

In the wake of the genocide, many Rwandan women have found it hard to rebuild their lives: more than 500,000 were raped and thousands widowed. Now more than a third of households are run by women, and 80 per cent of these live in severe poverty. Aspire Rwanda provides much-needed education, training and social support, and with your help will ensure these women are able to clothe their children and learn how to sew or speak English. 

Associação educacional e filantrópica Magnificat

Why stuff your rucksack?: 

We are a regognized NGO which survives from donations. The children and our crew will be happy to receive you.

Association des Personne Handicapees "Gorodibene" Tombouctou

Why stuff your rucksack?: 

This organisation is well organised, very committed, does great things and really needs a hand with resources. If you are going to the Festival of the Desert in Timbucktu, do take the time to seek the organisation out, go and see them and please offer some assistance. They both need it and deserve it. They ensure that disabled women have a high priority and are very keen to set up a literacy program, if they can obtain funding.

Baan Unrak

Why stuff your rucksack?: 

Baan Unrak has no support from the Thai government they rely entirely on donations & sponsorship of their children Did can never turn anyone away who asks for help. She never considers the cost before answering a request for assistance. Thee is an outreach programme helping Burmese refugees in the area & sh provides employment for Burmese people who couldn't find work elsewhere.

Baan Unrak Children's Home

Why stuff your rucksack?: 

Baan Unrak is a charity helping many people in the local community. It turns no one away empty handed. Helping them helps all the people in the community. A little charity goes a long way and your good deeds live on after you have left.
These children have nothing that people in the west are accustomed to, please give a little to help a lot. Thank you from the children of Baan Unrak.

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